tumblingtheology:

bookishboi:

lastrealindians:

Teen scientist harnesses sun power to help Navajo community
New Mexico teen Raquel Redshirt uses everyday materials and the sun to build solar ovens, fulfilling a Navajo community need and winning an award at the Intel ISEF competition.
Growing up on New Mexico’s Navajo Nation, Raquel Redshirt was well aware of the needs of her community. Many of her impoverished neighbors lacked basics such as electricity, as well as stoves and ovens to cook food.
Though resources in the high desert are limited, Raquel realized one was inexhaustible: the sun. “That’s where I got the idea of building a solar oven,” the teen says.
She researched solar ovens and found that most incorporate mirrors or other expensive materials. Raquel wanted to create a design that anyone could easily afford and replicate, using readily available materials.
READ MORE HERE: http://lrinspire.com/2014/06/19/teen-scientist-harnesses-sun-power-to-help-navajo-community/

Yes!!

GO NEW MEXICO! GO NAVAJO NATION! GO BRILLIANT TEENAGE GIRLS!

tumblingtheology:

bookishboi:

lastrealindians:

Teen scientist harnesses sun power to help Navajo community

New Mexico teen Raquel Redshirt uses everyday materials and the sun to build solar ovens, fulfilling a Navajo community need and winning an award at the Intel ISEF competition.

Growing up on New Mexico’s Navajo Nation, Raquel Redshirt was well aware of the needs of her community. Many of her impoverished neighbors lacked basics such as electricity, as well as stoves and ovens to cook food.

Though resources in the high desert are limited, Raquel realized one was inexhaustible: the sun. “That’s where I got the idea of building a solar oven,” the teen says.

She researched solar ovens and found that most incorporate mirrors or other expensive materials. Raquel wanted to create a design that anyone could easily afford and replicate, using readily available materials.

READ MORE HERE: http://lrinspire.com/2014/06/19/teen-scientist-harnesses-sun-power-to-help-navajo-community/

Yes!!

GO NEW MEXICO! GO NAVAJO NATION! GO BRILLIANT TEENAGE GIRLS!

feminism5ever:

Can we please, please talk about or at least acknowledge Simone Battle? A 25 year old black female singer who just committed suicide a few days ago? 

High profile suicides are always white girls. Black girls’ stories are always swept aside. Please, let’s not let Simone Battle’s go unnoticed.

exgynocraticgrrl:

[Gifset text reads:
"There’s a very good sentence written by a black woman named Kay Lindsey in which she said, ‘Where the white woman is the sexual object, black women are sexual laborers.’
White womanhood has been the prevailing standard of femininity in this country [the United States of America]. If you were beautiful you had pale skin,…you had light skin, preferably light hair, you were gentle, you were retiring, you were sweet, you were chaste.
Because of our historical position as black women, most of us were slaves which means we worked as hard as any man on the plantations, then we moved into factories. Most of us were not pure because on plantations we were bought to be breeders and whores. We were not qualified for the prevailing standards of femininity, white femininity, so we were passed down.
If you are a woman who does not fit women’s standards, you’re a piece of crap. So we [black women] got none of the benefits of being a woman. They’re double-edged benefits but they are benefits: money from wealthy men, so-on and so-forth. We [black women] got all of the liabilities. As I said before, we are on the lowest rung, even in a profession like prostitution because we are valueless as black women.
So we [black women] were brought up outside the pale of femininity but we weren’t considered worth turning into useful men; because ‘What is a Black Woman?’ She’s a woman and she is also black. We weren’t as good as black men and we were useless, we weren’t good enough to be imitating white women. So we had nothing.
[Black women] were total outsiders. Which is why economically we are on the absolute bottom and psychologically, if you will, of the barrel.”]


Margo Jefferson on Some American Feminists (1980)
Zoom Info
exgynocraticgrrl:

[Gifset text reads:
"There’s a very good sentence written by a black woman named Kay Lindsey in which she said, ‘Where the white woman is the sexual object, black women are sexual laborers.’
White womanhood has been the prevailing standard of femininity in this country [the United States of America]. If you were beautiful you had pale skin,…you had light skin, preferably light hair, you were gentle, you were retiring, you were sweet, you were chaste.
Because of our historical position as black women, most of us were slaves which means we worked as hard as any man on the plantations, then we moved into factories. Most of us were not pure because on plantations we were bought to be breeders and whores. We were not qualified for the prevailing standards of femininity, white femininity, so we were passed down.
If you are a woman who does not fit women’s standards, you’re a piece of crap. So we [black women] got none of the benefits of being a woman. They’re double-edged benefits but they are benefits: money from wealthy men, so-on and so-forth. We [black women] got all of the liabilities. As I said before, we are on the lowest rung, even in a profession like prostitution because we are valueless as black women.
So we [black women] were brought up outside the pale of femininity but we weren’t considered worth turning into useful men; because ‘What is a Black Woman?’ She’s a woman and she is also black. We weren’t as good as black men and we were useless, we weren’t good enough to be imitating white women. So we had nothing.
[Black women] were total outsiders. Which is why economically we are on the absolute bottom and psychologically, if you will, of the barrel.”]


Margo Jefferson on Some American Feminists (1980)
Zoom Info
exgynocraticgrrl:

[Gifset text reads:
"There’s a very good sentence written by a black woman named Kay Lindsey in which she said, ‘Where the white woman is the sexual object, black women are sexual laborers.’
White womanhood has been the prevailing standard of femininity in this country [the United States of America]. If you were beautiful you had pale skin,…you had light skin, preferably light hair, you were gentle, you were retiring, you were sweet, you were chaste.
Because of our historical position as black women, most of us were slaves which means we worked as hard as any man on the plantations, then we moved into factories. Most of us were not pure because on plantations we were bought to be breeders and whores. We were not qualified for the prevailing standards of femininity, white femininity, so we were passed down.
If you are a woman who does not fit women’s standards, you’re a piece of crap. So we [black women] got none of the benefits of being a woman. They’re double-edged benefits but they are benefits: money from wealthy men, so-on and so-forth. We [black women] got all of the liabilities. As I said before, we are on the lowest rung, even in a profession like prostitution because we are valueless as black women.
So we [black women] were brought up outside the pale of femininity but we weren’t considered worth turning into useful men; because ‘What is a Black Woman?’ She’s a woman and she is also black. We weren’t as good as black men and we were useless, we weren’t good enough to be imitating white women. So we had nothing.
[Black women] were total outsiders. Which is why economically we are on the absolute bottom and psychologically, if you will, of the barrel.”]


Margo Jefferson on Some American Feminists (1980)
Zoom Info
exgynocraticgrrl:

[Gifset text reads:
"There’s a very good sentence written by a black woman named Kay Lindsey in which she said, ‘Where the white woman is the sexual object, black women are sexual laborers.’
White womanhood has been the prevailing standard of femininity in this country [the United States of America]. If you were beautiful you had pale skin,…you had light skin, preferably light hair, you were gentle, you were retiring, you were sweet, you were chaste.
Because of our historical position as black women, most of us were slaves which means we worked as hard as any man on the plantations, then we moved into factories. Most of us were not pure because on plantations we were bought to be breeders and whores. We were not qualified for the prevailing standards of femininity, white femininity, so we were passed down.
If you are a woman who does not fit women’s standards, you’re a piece of crap. So we [black women] got none of the benefits of being a woman. They’re double-edged benefits but they are benefits: money from wealthy men, so-on and so-forth. We [black women] got all of the liabilities. As I said before, we are on the lowest rung, even in a profession like prostitution because we are valueless as black women.
So we [black women] were brought up outside the pale of femininity but we weren’t considered worth turning into useful men; because ‘What is a Black Woman?’ She’s a woman and she is also black. We weren’t as good as black men and we were useless, we weren’t good enough to be imitating white women. So we had nothing.
[Black women] were total outsiders. Which is why economically we are on the absolute bottom and psychologically, if you will, of the barrel.”]


Margo Jefferson on Some American Feminists (1980)
Zoom Info
exgynocraticgrrl:

[Gifset text reads:
"There’s a very good sentence written by a black woman named Kay Lindsey in which she said, ‘Where the white woman is the sexual object, black women are sexual laborers.’
White womanhood has been the prevailing standard of femininity in this country [the United States of America]. If you were beautiful you had pale skin,…you had light skin, preferably light hair, you were gentle, you were retiring, you were sweet, you were chaste.
Because of our historical position as black women, most of us were slaves which means we worked as hard as any man on the plantations, then we moved into factories. Most of us were not pure because on plantations we were bought to be breeders and whores. We were not qualified for the prevailing standards of femininity, white femininity, so we were passed down.
If you are a woman who does not fit women’s standards, you’re a piece of crap. So we [black women] got none of the benefits of being a woman. They’re double-edged benefits but they are benefits: money from wealthy men, so-on and so-forth. We [black women] got all of the liabilities. As I said before, we are on the lowest rung, even in a profession like prostitution because we are valueless as black women.
So we [black women] were brought up outside the pale of femininity but we weren’t considered worth turning into useful men; because ‘What is a Black Woman?’ She’s a woman and she is also black. We weren’t as good as black men and we were useless, we weren’t good enough to be imitating white women. So we had nothing.
[Black women] were total outsiders. Which is why economically we are on the absolute bottom and psychologically, if you will, of the barrel.”]


Margo Jefferson on Some American Feminists (1980)
Zoom Info
exgynocraticgrrl:

[Gifset text reads:
"There’s a very good sentence written by a black woman named Kay Lindsey in which she said, ‘Where the white woman is the sexual object, black women are sexual laborers.’
White womanhood has been the prevailing standard of femininity in this country [the United States of America]. If you were beautiful you had pale skin,…you had light skin, preferably light hair, you were gentle, you were retiring, you were sweet, you were chaste.
Because of our historical position as black women, most of us were slaves which means we worked as hard as any man on the plantations, then we moved into factories. Most of us were not pure because on plantations we were bought to be breeders and whores. We were not qualified for the prevailing standards of femininity, white femininity, so we were passed down.
If you are a woman who does not fit women’s standards, you’re a piece of crap. So we [black women] got none of the benefits of being a woman. They’re double-edged benefits but they are benefits: money from wealthy men, so-on and so-forth. We [black women] got all of the liabilities. As I said before, we are on the lowest rung, even in a profession like prostitution because we are valueless as black women.
So we [black women] were brought up outside the pale of femininity but we weren’t considered worth turning into useful men; because ‘What is a Black Woman?’ She’s a woman and she is also black. We weren’t as good as black men and we were useless, we weren’t good enough to be imitating white women. So we had nothing.
[Black women] were total outsiders. Which is why economically we are on the absolute bottom and psychologically, if you will, of the barrel.”]


Margo Jefferson on Some American Feminists (1980)
Zoom Info

exgynocraticgrrl:

[Gifset text reads:

"There’s a very good sentence written by a black woman named Kay Lindsey in which she said, ‘Where the white woman is the sexual object, black women are sexual laborers.’

White womanhood has been the prevailing standard of femininity in this country [the United States of America]. If you were beautiful you had pale skin,…you had light skin, preferably light hair, you were gentle, you were retiring, you were sweet, you were chaste.

Because of our historical position as black women, most of us were slaves which means we worked as hard as any man on the plantations, then we moved into factories. Most of us were not pure because on plantations we were bought to be breeders and whores. We were not qualified for the prevailing standards of femininity, white femininity, so we were passed down.

If you are a woman who does not fit women’s standards, you’re a piece of crap. So we [black women] got none of the benefits of being a woman. They’re double-edged benefits but they are benefits: money from wealthy men, so-on and so-forth. We [black women] got all of the liabilities. As I said before, we are on the lowest rung, even in a profession like prostitution because we are valueless as black women.

So we [black women] were brought up outside the pale of femininity but we weren’t considered worth turning into useful men; because ‘What is a Black Woman?’ She’s a woman and she is also black. We weren’t as good as black men and we were useless, we weren’t good enough to be imitating white women. So we had nothing.

[Black women] were total outsiders. Which is why economically we are on the absolute bottom and psychologically, if you will, of the barrel.”]

Margo Jefferson on Some American Feminists (1980)

5 Countries That Do It Better: How Sexual Prudery Makes America a Less Healthy and Happy Place | [alternet.org]

September 14, 2014 at 08:29AM

To extreme social conservatives of the far right, the word “prude” is not an insult — it’s a badge of honor. “Prudes,” they would argue, should be upheld as exemplary role models because a sexually repressive society is also a society with fewer unplanned pregnancies and fewer sexually transmitted diseases. But not only do the facts not bear that out, they also demonstrate that the exact opposite is true. Countries that embrace many of the things social conservatives detest comprehensive sex education, pro-gay legislation, nude or topless beaches, legal or decriminalized prostitution, adult entertainment tend to be countries that have less sexual dysfunction than the United States, not more. And when one compares sexual attitudes in the United States to sexual attitudes in Western Europe, it becomes evident that there is a strong correlation between social conservatism and higher rates of teen pregnancy, abortion and sexually transmitted diseases.

via 5 Countries That Do It Better: How Sexual Prudery Makes America a Less Healthy and Happy Place | Alternet.


Filed under: culture, people, Sexuality, social value, society Tagged: sexual prudery, Sexuality culture, people, Sexuality, social value, society, sexual prudery

from http://j.mp/XgbfqF (via lelapin)